North Carolina

States - Big Screen

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.98%
Change from
2014 to 2015
10,042,802
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
728,535
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
234,674
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
32.21%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.15%

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 9,848,060 9,943,964 10,042,802
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 702,652 715,508 728,535
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 213,209 224,009 234,674
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,895,591 3,962,362 4,036,261
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.34% 31.31% 32.21%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.54% 74.34% 75.15%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.90% 6.10% 5.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 24.10% 22.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.20% 15.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 637,484 643,764 648,264
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 693,320 700,805 721,126
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 942,844 951,171 964,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 311,209 317,673 326,487
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 44,037 50,174 57,974
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,572 20,762 21,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,628 10,249 13,697
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 813 738 N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 31,064 26,895 26,866
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 12,674 17,081 15,203

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,019 7,317 7,673
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.40% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 381,010 332,173 330,353

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,808 21,636 24,655
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 134,816 130,182 139,038
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 157,715 1,155,980 165,424
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.90% 13.90% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% N/A 5.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,652 N/A 6,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 96 90 1,062
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 69 49 389
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 72.00% 54.00% 37.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.71 0.50 3.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
10,869
11,470
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 30 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 615 642 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,871 2,661 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,409 3,661 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,762 3,262 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,168 1,214 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 12,920 12,057 12,196
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,968 473,647 475,276
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,755 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,407,000 $10,166,000 $18,642,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $20,753,000 $14,139,000 $18,045,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $86,490,000 $47,144,000 $89,164,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $139,418,000 $16,527,000 $16,485,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 22.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 9,501 3,827 2,711
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,209 2,592 2,833
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5,393 4,497 5,724
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 35.10 29.80 35.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.60% 66.25% 66.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.30% 13.55% 13.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.00% 1.98% 1.90%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 64.40% 85.07% 88.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.00% 29.77% 31.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 54.45% 61.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 63.00% 68.90% 72.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.98% 24.67% 29.23%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding private businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 75 76 53
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 5 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 82 56
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding private businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 5,812 3,959
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 681 575
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 6,494 4,534

 


North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other

Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

LME-MCO Communication Bulletin #J239 - 03/14/2017

~~“Effective July 22, 2016, subminimum wage employment for youth (age 14-24) cannot be considered until the following documentation is available to the subminimum wage employer:

1. The individual must receive either Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) while qualifying as a student with a disability or transition services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act from a school setting.

2. The individual must apply for VR services and:a. The individual must be determined ineligible for VR services. An individual cannot be determined ineligible due to the severity of the disability without first engaging in a trial work plan. Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income recipients must be presumed eligible if they intend to reach an employment outcome.ORb. The individual must be determined eligible and after receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for a reasonable period of time be unsuccessful in achieving competitive integrated employment. A reasonable period of time is defined as the anticipated time frame to receive services on the IPE. For supported employment, this may be 24 months with extensions if justified.AND

3. VR must provide career counseling and information about and referral to other resources available locally that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, discover, experience and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Disabilities Grant Program FAQ - 02/01/2017

~~“What is the Disabilities Grant Program?The Disabilities Grant Program expands school choice in North Carolina through scholarship grants for eligible children in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Disabilities Grant program provides funding of up to $8,000 per year to help parents pay qualified expenses for children with disabilities who attend school in an eligible setting.

Who applies? How does it work?Parents submit an application for the Disabilities Grant on behalf of their children. In order to receive Disabilities Grant funds, the student may attend a participating nonpublic school; the parent must arrange for application or enrollment at the school separately from the application for the Disabilities Grant. Parents, including parents who home school their children, may also seek reimbursement for qualified expenses. See the Program Overview for more information about how the Disabilities Grant works and the timeline for application and award. Also see the rest of these Frequently Asked Questions for more information about the application process and eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other

“Commerce Invests More in Apprenticeships through Federal Grant” - 11/10/2016

“More North Carolina students will learn about how to train for an industry and get an education, thanks to a major new investment by the state to increase awareness of apprenticeships. Through ApprenticeshipUSA, NC Commerce will receive $1.05 million to fund the NC Apprenticeship Expansion project, which will expand apprenticeships in manufacturing, logistics/transportation, health care, and information technology. The state will increase the participation of individuals, modernize information management technologies, expand the state’s capacity to register such programs, and increase awareness through outreach efforts. The expansion effort will serve 1,500 apprentices, with a focus on youth, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, minorities, women, and the economically disadvantaged”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Individual Supportive Employment (SE) with Long Term Vocational Supports (LTVS) YP630 - 04/18/2013

This DHHS guide on the delivery of Supported Employment services under the Developmental Disabilities and Vocational Rehabilitation systems includes Discovery, Customized Employment and Self Employment as billable services, and defines some standards for their delivery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

NC AFP Position Paper (February 2012) - 02/08/2013

This position paper represents a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Alliance on Full Participation to promote the values and principles of Employment First. 

The State of North Carolina shall implement Employment First policies and practices. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools - Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities (amended 7/2014) - 06/30/2010

NC 1500-2.37 Transition services  (a) Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1) Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; (2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes-- (i) Instruction; (ii) Related services; (iii) Community experiences; (iv) The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and (v) If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.   (b) Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(34); 34 CFR 300.43)  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Services for People with Disabilities

Helping our customers find or keep a job is the main goal of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). After an evaluation of the consumer’s strengths, skills and experience, we create an employment plan. The consumer and counselor jointly develop this plan.

An employment plan may include:

Vocational evaluation Diagnostic services Physical and mental restoration Assistive technology Transportation Modifications to vehicle, home, job and worksite Personal assistance College or vocational training On-the-job training

VR staff provide information on resumé preparation, interviewing and developing job leads and assistance in locating a job. After employment, the VR counselor and consumer stay in contact to help make sure the job is a good match. A community rehabilitation program may provide services such as job coaching, supported employment and adjustment activities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Self-Employment Procedures

Self-employment means earning and directing one's livelihood by working for oneself rather than an employer (Webster’s Dictionary). Self-employment is a viable employment option and an achievable vocational goal in rehabilitation planning for those individuals for whom an employment outcome in self-employment is consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and Informed Choice (IC) of the eligible individual. (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998, issued 8/7/98 and Rehabilitation Regulations of 1998, issued 1/17/01). A self-employment business is organized as a for-profit adventure and may be in the form of a sole proprietorship, partnership, Subchapter S Corporation, C Corporation, or Limited Liability Company.

Consideration of self-employment as an employment goal will usually occur early in the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process. It is essential the individual understands that part of being successful in business is to independently establish a business with securing funding as an essential step. The primary goal of the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is to provide technical assistance and resource identification. The State Agency can provide guidance but shall not be considered the only resource for training, technical assistance, or financial assistance related to the business venture.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NC Employment First Website

This document outlines the services offered by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, including employment plans, employment counselors, School-to-Life services, rehabilitation engineering and benefits counseling.

NC DHHS Employment First philosophy and practice:

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC DHHS Supported Employment Services

This document outlines the eligibility, the individualized plan for employment (IPE), the milestones, and post-employment steps for Supported Employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

NC Department of Commerce

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

Overall Goal: Share and disseminate information, romote [sic] collaboration, and advocate for improved services and improved outcomes in all areas of life for children and emerging young adults in transition.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Business Leadership Network (NCBLN)

We believe you will both enjoy and benefit from your association with our organization, as we work to expand a business-to-business network across the state that recognizes the opportunities and competitive advantages created when comprehensively engaging people with disabilities. We’re interested in talent, market share, and supplier diversity. Our job is to help you, and to hopefully engage you in helping us help others. Whether you’re a business, large or small, an agency or service provider, let us introduce you to the NCBLN and explain what we are doing, how we do it, and most importantly, where we are headed in the future.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“…ODEP has initiated the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a cross-disability, cross-systems change initiative. EFSLMP is providing a platform for multi-disciplinary state teams to focus on implementing the Employment First approach with fidelity through the alignment of policies, coordination of resources, updating of service delivery models, to facilitate increased integrated employment options for people with the most significant disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

DVRS directly administers two community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). CRPs are equipped to offer a range of employment-related and support services to VR consumers with specialized needs. Services include: vocational evaluation, community-based assessment, job development, job coaching, individual or group supported employment and work adjustment activities designed to help individuals improve work skills, work behaviors and emotional/physical tolerances for a range of jobs.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

“The Johnson & Johnson – Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, also known as the IPS Learning Collaborative, established the family advocacy project to advance family participation in three ways. First, family advocates can educate IPS teams regarding the important roles that family can play in the employment process on an individual basis. Second, families can help educate other families and community members about the benefits of IPS supported employment and working. Third, family advocates can help promote expansion of IPS services into other communities in their state and help sustain services by advocating with the state legislature for policy and budgetary supports for IPS programs.”

“In 2013, North Carolina was invited into the larger IPS learning collaborative and is planning its family teams. Leadership of these teams have been primarily assumed through the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) state organizations. The teams are closely connected with the state IPS teams that are part of the IPS learning collaborative.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other

Discovery and Customized Employment Process Training

This site was the gateway to live trainings but now contains links to presentations and handouts on Customized Employment and Discovery.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2016 NC APSE Conference

The ADA not only protects people with disabilities from discrimination, but also allows them to fully participate in the workforce and their communities. The theme of this conference focuses on the changes that have resulted from the passing of the ADA. We will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to learn so that they can educate and advocate for employment services throughout North Carolina.   The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers. Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for CESP and IPS ongoing trainings.    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Developmental Disabilities Training Institute

The mission of the Developmental Disabilities Training Institute is to foster improvements in services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities (and those with a dual diagnosis of a developmental disability and a mental health issue) through developing the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff and others involved in their lives. This includes three major areas of activity: Research within the field of developmental disabilities to identify best practices and to clarify values that enhance individual lives  Information dissemination to administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals in the field through the development of in-service training activities, collaborative work, and presentations Targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations involved in managing, coordinating, or providing services to individuals and their families.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools Transition Training

This PowerPoint explains post-secondary transition training and describes how education professionals should structure post-secondary transition planning.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative.   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC HCBS Transition Plan - 01/19/2015

The purpose of North Carolina’s preliminary transition plan, for wavier beneficiaries, is to ensure that individuals have full access to communities of their choosing. A t a minimum, this choice will include real opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively  within an integrated work force . As a result individuals will have opportunities to engage in life experiences within their own communities while improving personal outcomes. Our State’s primary goal is to ensure full compliance with HCBS Final Rule.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Supports Waiver (3.5) (0663.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, home and community supports, personal care, respite, supported employment, behavior consultation, crisis respite, crisis services, home mods, individual and caregiver training, individual goods and services (SD only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Comprehensive Waiver (3.5) (0662.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, personal care, residential supports, respite, supported employment, behavior consultant, community transition, crisis respite, crisis services, home and community supports, home mods, individual caregiver training and education, individual goods and services (self-direction only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Large Tablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.98%
Change from
2014 to 2015
10,042,802
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
728,535
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
234,674
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
32.21%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.15%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 9,848,060 9,943,964 10,042,802
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 702,652 715,508 728,535
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 213,209 224,009 234,674
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,895,591 3,962,362 4,036,261
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.34% 31.31% 32.21%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.54% 74.34% 75.15%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.90% 6.10% 5.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 24.10% 22.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.20% 15.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 637,484 643,764 648,264
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 693,320 700,805 721,126
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 942,844 951,171 964,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 311,209 317,673 326,487
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 44,037 50,174 57,974
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,572 20,762 21,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,628 10,249 13,697
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 813 738 N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 31,064 26,895 26,866
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 12,674 17,081 15,203

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,019 7,317 7,673
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.40% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 381,010 332,173 330,353

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,808 21,636 24,655
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 134,816 130,182 139,038
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 157,715 1,155,980 165,424
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.90% 13.90% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% N/A 5.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,652 N/A 6,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 96 90 1,062
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 69 49 389
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 72.00% 54.00% 37.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.71 0.50 3.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
10,869
11,470
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 30 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 615 642 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,871 2,661 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,409 3,661 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,762 3,262 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,168 1,214 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 12,920 12,057 12,196
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,968 473,647 475,276
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,755 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,407,000 $10,166,000 $18,642,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $20,753,000 $14,139,000 $18,045,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $86,490,000 $47,144,000 $89,164,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $139,418,000 $16,527,000 $16,485,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 22.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 9,501 3,827 2,711
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,209 2,592 2,833
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5,393 4,497 5,724
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 35.10 29.80 35.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.60% 66.25% 66.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.30% 13.55% 13.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.00% 1.98% 1.90%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 64.40% 85.07% 88.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.00% 29.77% 31.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 54.45% 61.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 63.00% 68.90% 72.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.98% 24.67% 29.23%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding private businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 75 76 53
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 5 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 82 56
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding private businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 5,812 3,959
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 681 575
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 6,494 4,534

 

Legislation


North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other

Executive Orders


Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Policy


LME-MCO Communication Bulletin #J239 - 03/14/2017

~~“Effective July 22, 2016, subminimum wage employment for youth (age 14-24) cannot be considered until the following documentation is available to the subminimum wage employer:

1. The individual must receive either Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) while qualifying as a student with a disability or transition services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act from a school setting.

2. The individual must apply for VR services and:a. The individual must be determined ineligible for VR services. An individual cannot be determined ineligible due to the severity of the disability without first engaging in a trial work plan. Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income recipients must be presumed eligible if they intend to reach an employment outcome.ORb. The individual must be determined eligible and after receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for a reasonable period of time be unsuccessful in achieving competitive integrated employment. A reasonable period of time is defined as the anticipated time frame to receive services on the IPE. For supported employment, this may be 24 months with extensions if justified.AND

3. VR must provide career counseling and information about and referral to other resources available locally that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, discover, experience and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Disabilities Grant Program FAQ - 02/01/2017

~~“What is the Disabilities Grant Program?The Disabilities Grant Program expands school choice in North Carolina through scholarship grants for eligible children in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Disabilities Grant program provides funding of up to $8,000 per year to help parents pay qualified expenses for children with disabilities who attend school in an eligible setting.

Who applies? How does it work?Parents submit an application for the Disabilities Grant on behalf of their children. In order to receive Disabilities Grant funds, the student may attend a participating nonpublic school; the parent must arrange for application or enrollment at the school separately from the application for the Disabilities Grant. Parents, including parents who home school their children, may also seek reimbursement for qualified expenses. See the Program Overview for more information about how the Disabilities Grant works and the timeline for application and award. Also see the rest of these Frequently Asked Questions for more information about the application process and eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other

“Commerce Invests More in Apprenticeships through Federal Grant” - 11/10/2016

“More North Carolina students will learn about how to train for an industry and get an education, thanks to a major new investment by the state to increase awareness of apprenticeships. Through ApprenticeshipUSA, NC Commerce will receive $1.05 million to fund the NC Apprenticeship Expansion project, which will expand apprenticeships in manufacturing, logistics/transportation, health care, and information technology. The state will increase the participation of individuals, modernize information management technologies, expand the state’s capacity to register such programs, and increase awareness through outreach efforts. The expansion effort will serve 1,500 apprentices, with a focus on youth, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, minorities, women, and the economically disadvantaged”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Individual Supportive Employment (SE) with Long Term Vocational Supports (LTVS) YP630 - 04/18/2013

This DHHS guide on the delivery of Supported Employment services under the Developmental Disabilities and Vocational Rehabilitation systems includes Discovery, Customized Employment and Self Employment as billable services, and defines some standards for their delivery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

NC AFP Position Paper (February 2012) - 02/08/2013

This position paper represents a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Alliance on Full Participation to promote the values and principles of Employment First. 

The State of North Carolina shall implement Employment First policies and practices. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools - Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities (amended 7/2014) - 06/30/2010

NC 1500-2.37 Transition services  (a) Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1) Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; (2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes-- (i) Instruction; (ii) Related services; (iii) Community experiences; (iv) The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and (v) If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.   (b) Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(34); 34 CFR 300.43)  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Services for People with Disabilities

Helping our customers find or keep a job is the main goal of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). After an evaluation of the consumer’s strengths, skills and experience, we create an employment plan. The consumer and counselor jointly develop this plan.

An employment plan may include:

Vocational evaluation Diagnostic services Physical and mental restoration Assistive technology Transportation Modifications to vehicle, home, job and worksite Personal assistance College or vocational training On-the-job training

VR staff provide information on resumé preparation, interviewing and developing job leads and assistance in locating a job. After employment, the VR counselor and consumer stay in contact to help make sure the job is a good match. A community rehabilitation program may provide services such as job coaching, supported employment and adjustment activities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Self-Employment Procedures

Self-employment means earning and directing one's livelihood by working for oneself rather than an employer (Webster’s Dictionary). Self-employment is a viable employment option and an achievable vocational goal in rehabilitation planning for those individuals for whom an employment outcome in self-employment is consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and Informed Choice (IC) of the eligible individual. (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998, issued 8/7/98 and Rehabilitation Regulations of 1998, issued 1/17/01). A self-employment business is organized as a for-profit adventure and may be in the form of a sole proprietorship, partnership, Subchapter S Corporation, C Corporation, or Limited Liability Company.

Consideration of self-employment as an employment goal will usually occur early in the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process. It is essential the individual understands that part of being successful in business is to independently establish a business with securing funding as an essential step. The primary goal of the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is to provide technical assistance and resource identification. The State Agency can provide guidance but shall not be considered the only resource for training, technical assistance, or financial assistance related to the business venture.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NC Employment First Website

This document outlines the services offered by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, including employment plans, employment counselors, School-to-Life services, rehabilitation engineering and benefits counseling.

NC DHHS Employment First philosophy and practice:

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC DHHS Supported Employment Services

This document outlines the eligibility, the individualized plan for employment (IPE), the milestones, and post-employment steps for Supported Employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Partnerships


NC Department of Commerce

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

Overall Goal: Share and disseminate information, romote [sic] collaboration, and advocate for improved services and improved outcomes in all areas of life for children and emerging young adults in transition.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Business Leadership Network (NCBLN)

We believe you will both enjoy and benefit from your association with our organization, as we work to expand a business-to-business network across the state that recognizes the opportunities and competitive advantages created when comprehensively engaging people with disabilities. We’re interested in talent, market share, and supplier diversity. Our job is to help you, and to hopefully engage you in helping us help others. Whether you’re a business, large or small, an agency or service provider, let us introduce you to the NCBLN and explain what we are doing, how we do it, and most importantly, where we are headed in the future.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“…ODEP has initiated the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a cross-disability, cross-systems change initiative. EFSLMP is providing a platform for multi-disciplinary state teams to focus on implementing the Employment First approach with fidelity through the alignment of policies, coordination of resources, updating of service delivery models, to facilitate increased integrated employment options for people with the most significant disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

DVRS directly administers two community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). CRPs are equipped to offer a range of employment-related and support services to VR consumers with specialized needs. Services include: vocational evaluation, community-based assessment, job development, job coaching, individual or group supported employment and work adjustment activities designed to help individuals improve work skills, work behaviors and emotional/physical tolerances for a range of jobs.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Systems-Change Funding


NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

“The Johnson & Johnson – Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, also known as the IPS Learning Collaborative, established the family advocacy project to advance family participation in three ways. First, family advocates can educate IPS teams regarding the important roles that family can play in the employment process on an individual basis. Second, families can help educate other families and community members about the benefits of IPS supported employment and working. Third, family advocates can help promote expansion of IPS services into other communities in their state and help sustain services by advocating with the state legislature for policy and budgetary supports for IPS programs.”

“In 2013, North Carolina was invited into the larger IPS learning collaborative and is planning its family teams. Leadership of these teams have been primarily assumed through the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) state organizations. The teams are closely connected with the state IPS teams that are part of the IPS learning collaborative.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training/Capacity Building


Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other

Discovery and Customized Employment Process Training

This site was the gateway to live trainings but now contains links to presentations and handouts on Customized Employment and Discovery.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2016 NC APSE Conference

The ADA not only protects people with disabilities from discrimination, but also allows them to fully participate in the workforce and their communities. The theme of this conference focuses on the changes that have resulted from the passing of the ADA. We will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to learn so that they can educate and advocate for employment services throughout North Carolina.   The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers. Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for CESP and IPS ongoing trainings.    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Developmental Disabilities Training Institute

The mission of the Developmental Disabilities Training Institute is to foster improvements in services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities (and those with a dual diagnosis of a developmental disability and a mental health issue) through developing the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff and others involved in their lives. This includes three major areas of activity: Research within the field of developmental disabilities to identify best practices and to clarify values that enhance individual lives  Information dissemination to administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals in the field through the development of in-service training activities, collaborative work, and presentations Targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations involved in managing, coordinating, or providing services to individuals and their families.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools Transition Training

This PowerPoint explains post-secondary transition training and describes how education professionals should structure post-secondary transition planning.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Enforcement


DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative.   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid & Employment


North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC HCBS Transition Plan - 01/19/2015

The purpose of North Carolina’s preliminary transition plan, for wavier beneficiaries, is to ensure that individuals have full access to communities of their choosing. A t a minimum, this choice will include real opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively  within an integrated work force . As a result individuals will have opportunities to engage in life experiences within their own communities while improving personal outcomes. Our State’s primary goal is to ensure full compliance with HCBS Final Rule.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Supports Waiver (3.5) (0663.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, home and community supports, personal care, respite, supported employment, behavior consultation, crisis respite, crisis services, home mods, individual and caregiver training, individual goods and services (SD only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Comprehensive Waiver (3.5) (0662.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, personal care, residential supports, respite, supported employment, behavior consultant, community transition, crisis respite, crisis services, home and community supports, home mods, individual caregiver training and education, individual goods and services (self-direction only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Small Tablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.98%
Change from
2014 to 2015
10,042,802
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
728,535
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
234,674
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
32.21%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.15%

State Data

General

2013 2014 2015
Population. 9,848,060 9,943,964 10,042,802
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 702,652 715,508 728,535
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 213,209 224,009 234,674
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 3,895,591 3,962,362 4,036,261
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 30.34% 31.31% 32.21%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 73.54% 74.34% 75.15%
Overall unemployment rate. 7.90% 6.10% 5.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 24.80% 24.10% 22.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 16.90% 16.20% 15.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 637,484 643,764 648,264
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 693,320 700,805 721,126
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 942,844 951,171 964,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 311,209 317,673 326,487
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 44,037 50,174 57,974
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 20,572 20,762 21,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 11,628 10,249 13,697
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). 813 738 N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 31,064 26,895 26,866
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 12,674 17,081 15,203

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,019 7,317 7,673
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.20% 3.40% 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 381,010 332,173 330,353

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 18,808 21,636 24,655
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 134,816 130,182 139,038
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 157,715 1,155,980 165,424
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 11.90% 13.90% 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 4.30% N/A 5.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A N/A N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 4,652 N/A 6,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A N/A N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2013 2014 2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 11,395 15,318 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.02 0.15 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2012 2013 2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 96 90 1,062
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 69 49 389
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 72.00% 54.00% 37.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 0.71 0.50 3.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
10,869
11,470
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. 44 30 N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. 615 642 N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. 2,871 2,661 N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. 3,409 3,661 N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. 2,762 3,262 N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. 1,168 1,214 N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. 30.20% N/A N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 12,920 12,057 12,196
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 471,968 473,647 475,276
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A N/A N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. 1,755 N/A N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $16,407,000 $10,166,000 $18,642,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $20,753,000 $14,139,000 $18,045,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $86,490,000 $47,144,000 $89,164,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $139,418,000 $16,527,000 $16,485,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 16.00% 22.00% 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 9,501 3,827 2,711
Number of people served in facility based work. 3,209 2,592 2,833
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5,393 4,497 5,724
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 35.10 29.80 35.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2012 2013 2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 65.60% 66.25% 66.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 15.30% 13.55% 13.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 2.00% 1.98% 1.90%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 64.40% 85.07% 88.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.00% 29.77% 31.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 57.00% 54.45% 61.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 63.00% 68.90% 72.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 25.98% 24.67% 29.23%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2014 2015 2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding private businesses. 1 1 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0 0 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 75 76 53
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 5 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 82 56
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding private businesses. N/A 1 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). N/A 0 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). N/A 5,812 3,959
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. N/A 681 575
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. N/A 6,494 4,534

 

Legislation


North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other

Executive Orders


Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Policy


LME-MCO Communication Bulletin #J239 - 03/14/2017

~~“Effective July 22, 2016, subminimum wage employment for youth (age 14-24) cannot be considered until the following documentation is available to the subminimum wage employer:

1. The individual must receive either Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) while qualifying as a student with a disability or transition services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act from a school setting.

2. The individual must apply for VR services and:a. The individual must be determined ineligible for VR services. An individual cannot be determined ineligible due to the severity of the disability without first engaging in a trial work plan. Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income recipients must be presumed eligible if they intend to reach an employment outcome.ORb. The individual must be determined eligible and after receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for a reasonable period of time be unsuccessful in achieving competitive integrated employment. A reasonable period of time is defined as the anticipated time frame to receive services on the IPE. For supported employment, this may be 24 months with extensions if justified.AND

3. VR must provide career counseling and information about and referral to other resources available locally that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, discover, experience and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Disabilities Grant Program FAQ - 02/01/2017

~~“What is the Disabilities Grant Program?The Disabilities Grant Program expands school choice in North Carolina through scholarship grants for eligible children in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Disabilities Grant program provides funding of up to $8,000 per year to help parents pay qualified expenses for children with disabilities who attend school in an eligible setting.

Who applies? How does it work?Parents submit an application for the Disabilities Grant on behalf of their children. In order to receive Disabilities Grant funds, the student may attend a participating nonpublic school; the parent must arrange for application or enrollment at the school separately from the application for the Disabilities Grant. Parents, including parents who home school their children, may also seek reimbursement for qualified expenses. See the Program Overview for more information about how the Disabilities Grant works and the timeline for application and award. Also see the rest of these Frequently Asked Questions for more information about the application process and eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other

“Commerce Invests More in Apprenticeships through Federal Grant” - 11/10/2016

“More North Carolina students will learn about how to train for an industry and get an education, thanks to a major new investment by the state to increase awareness of apprenticeships. Through ApprenticeshipUSA, NC Commerce will receive $1.05 million to fund the NC Apprenticeship Expansion project, which will expand apprenticeships in manufacturing, logistics/transportation, health care, and information technology. The state will increase the participation of individuals, modernize information management technologies, expand the state’s capacity to register such programs, and increase awareness through outreach efforts. The expansion effort will serve 1,500 apprentices, with a focus on youth, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, minorities, women, and the economically disadvantaged”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Individual Supportive Employment (SE) with Long Term Vocational Supports (LTVS) YP630 - 04/18/2013

This DHHS guide on the delivery of Supported Employment services under the Developmental Disabilities and Vocational Rehabilitation systems includes Discovery, Customized Employment and Self Employment as billable services, and defines some standards for their delivery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

NC AFP Position Paper (February 2012) - 02/08/2013

This position paper represents a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Alliance on Full Participation to promote the values and principles of Employment First. 

The State of North Carolina shall implement Employment First policies and practices. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools - Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities (amended 7/2014) - 06/30/2010

NC 1500-2.37 Transition services  (a) Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1) Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; (2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes-- (i) Instruction; (ii) Related services; (iii) Community experiences; (iv) The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and (v) If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.   (b) Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(34); 34 CFR 300.43)  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Services for People with Disabilities

Helping our customers find or keep a job is the main goal of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). After an evaluation of the consumer’s strengths, skills and experience, we create an employment plan. The consumer and counselor jointly develop this plan.

An employment plan may include:

Vocational evaluation Diagnostic services Physical and mental restoration Assistive technology Transportation Modifications to vehicle, home, job and worksite Personal assistance College or vocational training On-the-job training

VR staff provide information on resumé preparation, interviewing and developing job leads and assistance in locating a job. After employment, the VR counselor and consumer stay in contact to help make sure the job is a good match. A community rehabilitation program may provide services such as job coaching, supported employment and adjustment activities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Self-Employment Procedures

Self-employment means earning and directing one's livelihood by working for oneself rather than an employer (Webster’s Dictionary). Self-employment is a viable employment option and an achievable vocational goal in rehabilitation planning for those individuals for whom an employment outcome in self-employment is consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and Informed Choice (IC) of the eligible individual. (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998, issued 8/7/98 and Rehabilitation Regulations of 1998, issued 1/17/01). A self-employment business is organized as a for-profit adventure and may be in the form of a sole proprietorship, partnership, Subchapter S Corporation, C Corporation, or Limited Liability Company.

Consideration of self-employment as an employment goal will usually occur early in the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process. It is essential the individual understands that part of being successful in business is to independently establish a business with securing funding as an essential step. The primary goal of the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is to provide technical assistance and resource identification. The State Agency can provide guidance but shall not be considered the only resource for training, technical assistance, or financial assistance related to the business venture.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NC Employment First Website

This document outlines the services offered by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, including employment plans, employment counselors, School-to-Life services, rehabilitation engineering and benefits counseling.

NC DHHS Employment First philosophy and practice:

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC DHHS Supported Employment Services

This document outlines the eligibility, the individualized plan for employment (IPE), the milestones, and post-employment steps for Supported Employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Partnerships


NC Department of Commerce

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

Overall Goal: Share and disseminate information, romote [sic] collaboration, and advocate for improved services and improved outcomes in all areas of life for children and emerging young adults in transition.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Business Leadership Network (NCBLN)

We believe you will both enjoy and benefit from your association with our organization, as we work to expand a business-to-business network across the state that recognizes the opportunities and competitive advantages created when comprehensively engaging people with disabilities. We’re interested in talent, market share, and supplier diversity. Our job is to help you, and to hopefully engage you in helping us help others. Whether you’re a business, large or small, an agency or service provider, let us introduce you to the NCBLN and explain what we are doing, how we do it, and most importantly, where we are headed in the future.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“…ODEP has initiated the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a cross-disability, cross-systems change initiative. EFSLMP is providing a platform for multi-disciplinary state teams to focus on implementing the Employment First approach with fidelity through the alignment of policies, coordination of resources, updating of service delivery models, to facilitate increased integrated employment options for people with the most significant disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

DVRS directly administers two community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). CRPs are equipped to offer a range of employment-related and support services to VR consumers with specialized needs. Services include: vocational evaluation, community-based assessment, job development, job coaching, individual or group supported employment and work adjustment activities designed to help individuals improve work skills, work behaviors and emotional/physical tolerances for a range of jobs.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Systems-Change Funding


NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

“The Johnson & Johnson – Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, also known as the IPS Learning Collaborative, established the family advocacy project to advance family participation in three ways. First, family advocates can educate IPS teams regarding the important roles that family can play in the employment process on an individual basis. Second, families can help educate other families and community members about the benefits of IPS supported employment and working. Third, family advocates can help promote expansion of IPS services into other communities in their state and help sustain services by advocating with the state legislature for policy and budgetary supports for IPS programs.”

“In 2013, North Carolina was invited into the larger IPS learning collaborative and is planning its family teams. Leadership of these teams have been primarily assumed through the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) state organizations. The teams are closely connected with the state IPS teams that are part of the IPS learning collaborative.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training/Capacity Building


Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other

Discovery and Customized Employment Process Training

This site was the gateway to live trainings but now contains links to presentations and handouts on Customized Employment and Discovery.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2016 NC APSE Conference

The ADA not only protects people with disabilities from discrimination, but also allows them to fully participate in the workforce and their communities. The theme of this conference focuses on the changes that have resulted from the passing of the ADA. We will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to learn so that they can educate and advocate for employment services throughout North Carolina.   The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers. Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for CESP and IPS ongoing trainings.    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Developmental Disabilities Training Institute

The mission of the Developmental Disabilities Training Institute is to foster improvements in services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities (and those with a dual diagnosis of a developmental disability and a mental health issue) through developing the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff and others involved in their lives. This includes three major areas of activity: Research within the field of developmental disabilities to identify best practices and to clarify values that enhance individual lives  Information dissemination to administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals in the field through the development of in-service training activities, collaborative work, and presentations Targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations involved in managing, coordinating, or providing services to individuals and their families.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools Transition Training

This PowerPoint explains post-secondary transition training and describes how education professionals should structure post-secondary transition planning.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Enforcement


DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative.   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid & Employment


North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC HCBS Transition Plan - 01/19/2015

The purpose of North Carolina’s preliminary transition plan, for wavier beneficiaries, is to ensure that individuals have full access to communities of their choosing. A t a minimum, this choice will include real opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively  within an integrated work force . As a result individuals will have opportunities to engage in life experiences within their own communities while improving personal outcomes. Our State’s primary goal is to ensure full compliance with HCBS Final Rule.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Supports Waiver (3.5) (0663.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, home and community supports, personal care, respite, supported employment, behavior consultation, crisis respite, crisis services, home mods, individual and caregiver training, individual goods and services (SD only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Comprehensive Waiver (3.5) (0662.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, personal care, residential supports, respite, supported employment, behavior consultant, community transition, crisis respite, crisis services, home and community supports, home mods, individual caregiver training and education, individual goods and services (self-direction only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phablet

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.98%
Change from
2014 to 2015
10,042,802
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
728,535
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
234,674
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
32.21%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.15%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 10,042,802
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 728,535
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 234,674
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,036,261
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.21%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.15%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 648,264
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 721,126
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 964,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 326,487
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 57,974
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 21,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,697
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 26,866
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 15,203

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,673
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 330,353

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 24,655
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 139,038
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 165,424
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,062
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 389
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 37.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 12,196
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 475,276
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,642,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $18,045,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $89,164,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,485,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,711
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,833
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5,724
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 35.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.90%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.23%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding private businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 53
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 56
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding private businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,959
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 575
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,534

 

Legislation


North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other

Executive Orders


Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Policy


LME-MCO Communication Bulletin #J239 - 03/14/2017

~~“Effective July 22, 2016, subminimum wage employment for youth (age 14-24) cannot be considered until the following documentation is available to the subminimum wage employer:

1. The individual must receive either Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) while qualifying as a student with a disability or transition services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act from a school setting.

2. The individual must apply for VR services and:a. The individual must be determined ineligible for VR services. An individual cannot be determined ineligible due to the severity of the disability without first engaging in a trial work plan. Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income recipients must be presumed eligible if they intend to reach an employment outcome.ORb. The individual must be determined eligible and after receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for a reasonable period of time be unsuccessful in achieving competitive integrated employment. A reasonable period of time is defined as the anticipated time frame to receive services on the IPE. For supported employment, this may be 24 months with extensions if justified.AND

3. VR must provide career counseling and information about and referral to other resources available locally that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, discover, experience and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Disabilities Grant Program FAQ - 02/01/2017

~~“What is the Disabilities Grant Program?The Disabilities Grant Program expands school choice in North Carolina through scholarship grants for eligible children in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Disabilities Grant program provides funding of up to $8,000 per year to help parents pay qualified expenses for children with disabilities who attend school in an eligible setting.

Who applies? How does it work?Parents submit an application for the Disabilities Grant on behalf of their children. In order to receive Disabilities Grant funds, the student may attend a participating nonpublic school; the parent must arrange for application or enrollment at the school separately from the application for the Disabilities Grant. Parents, including parents who home school their children, may also seek reimbursement for qualified expenses. See the Program Overview for more information about how the Disabilities Grant works and the timeline for application and award. Also see the rest of these Frequently Asked Questions for more information about the application process and eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other

“Commerce Invests More in Apprenticeships through Federal Grant” - 11/10/2016

“More North Carolina students will learn about how to train for an industry and get an education, thanks to a major new investment by the state to increase awareness of apprenticeships. Through ApprenticeshipUSA, NC Commerce will receive $1.05 million to fund the NC Apprenticeship Expansion project, which will expand apprenticeships in manufacturing, logistics/transportation, health care, and information technology. The state will increase the participation of individuals, modernize information management technologies, expand the state’s capacity to register such programs, and increase awareness through outreach efforts. The expansion effort will serve 1,500 apprentices, with a focus on youth, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, minorities, women, and the economically disadvantaged”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Individual Supportive Employment (SE) with Long Term Vocational Supports (LTVS) YP630 - 04/18/2013

This DHHS guide on the delivery of Supported Employment services under the Developmental Disabilities and Vocational Rehabilitation systems includes Discovery, Customized Employment and Self Employment as billable services, and defines some standards for their delivery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

NC AFP Position Paper (February 2012) - 02/08/2013

This position paper represents a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Alliance on Full Participation to promote the values and principles of Employment First. 

The State of North Carolina shall implement Employment First policies and practices. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools - Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities (amended 7/2014) - 06/30/2010

NC 1500-2.37 Transition services  (a) Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1) Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; (2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes-- (i) Instruction; (ii) Related services; (iii) Community experiences; (iv) The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and (v) If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.   (b) Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(34); 34 CFR 300.43)  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Services for People with Disabilities

Helping our customers find or keep a job is the main goal of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). After an evaluation of the consumer’s strengths, skills and experience, we create an employment plan. The consumer and counselor jointly develop this plan.

An employment plan may include:

Vocational evaluation Diagnostic services Physical and mental restoration Assistive technology Transportation Modifications to vehicle, home, job and worksite Personal assistance College or vocational training On-the-job training

VR staff provide information on resumé preparation, interviewing and developing job leads and assistance in locating a job. After employment, the VR counselor and consumer stay in contact to help make sure the job is a good match. A community rehabilitation program may provide services such as job coaching, supported employment and adjustment activities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Self-Employment Procedures

Self-employment means earning and directing one's livelihood by working for oneself rather than an employer (Webster’s Dictionary). Self-employment is a viable employment option and an achievable vocational goal in rehabilitation planning for those individuals for whom an employment outcome in self-employment is consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and Informed Choice (IC) of the eligible individual. (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998, issued 8/7/98 and Rehabilitation Regulations of 1998, issued 1/17/01). A self-employment business is organized as a for-profit adventure and may be in the form of a sole proprietorship, partnership, Subchapter S Corporation, C Corporation, or Limited Liability Company.

Consideration of self-employment as an employment goal will usually occur early in the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process. It is essential the individual understands that part of being successful in business is to independently establish a business with securing funding as an essential step. The primary goal of the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is to provide technical assistance and resource identification. The State Agency can provide guidance but shall not be considered the only resource for training, technical assistance, or financial assistance related to the business venture.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NC Employment First Website

This document outlines the services offered by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, including employment plans, employment counselors, School-to-Life services, rehabilitation engineering and benefits counseling.

NC DHHS Employment First philosophy and practice:

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC DHHS Supported Employment Services

This document outlines the eligibility, the individualized plan for employment (IPE), the milestones, and post-employment steps for Supported Employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Partnerships


NC Department of Commerce

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

Overall Goal: Share and disseminate information, romote [sic] collaboration, and advocate for improved services and improved outcomes in all areas of life for children and emerging young adults in transition.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Business Leadership Network (NCBLN)

We believe you will both enjoy and benefit from your association with our organization, as we work to expand a business-to-business network across the state that recognizes the opportunities and competitive advantages created when comprehensively engaging people with disabilities. We’re interested in talent, market share, and supplier diversity. Our job is to help you, and to hopefully engage you in helping us help others. Whether you’re a business, large or small, an agency or service provider, let us introduce you to the NCBLN and explain what we are doing, how we do it, and most importantly, where we are headed in the future.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“…ODEP has initiated the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a cross-disability, cross-systems change initiative. EFSLMP is providing a platform for multi-disciplinary state teams to focus on implementing the Employment First approach with fidelity through the alignment of policies, coordination of resources, updating of service delivery models, to facilitate increased integrated employment options for people with the most significant disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

DVRS directly administers two community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). CRPs are equipped to offer a range of employment-related and support services to VR consumers with specialized needs. Services include: vocational evaluation, community-based assessment, job development, job coaching, individual or group supported employment and work adjustment activities designed to help individuals improve work skills, work behaviors and emotional/physical tolerances for a range of jobs.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Systems-Change Funding


NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

“The Johnson & Johnson – Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, also known as the IPS Learning Collaborative, established the family advocacy project to advance family participation in three ways. First, family advocates can educate IPS teams regarding the important roles that family can play in the employment process on an individual basis. Second, families can help educate other families and community members about the benefits of IPS supported employment and working. Third, family advocates can help promote expansion of IPS services into other communities in their state and help sustain services by advocating with the state legislature for policy and budgetary supports for IPS programs.”

“In 2013, North Carolina was invited into the larger IPS learning collaborative and is planning its family teams. Leadership of these teams have been primarily assumed through the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) state organizations. The teams are closely connected with the state IPS teams that are part of the IPS learning collaborative.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training/Capacity Building


Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other

Discovery and Customized Employment Process Training

This site was the gateway to live trainings but now contains links to presentations and handouts on Customized Employment and Discovery.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2016 NC APSE Conference

The ADA not only protects people with disabilities from discrimination, but also allows them to fully participate in the workforce and their communities. The theme of this conference focuses on the changes that have resulted from the passing of the ADA. We will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to learn so that they can educate and advocate for employment services throughout North Carolina.   The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers. Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for CESP and IPS ongoing trainings.    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Developmental Disabilities Training Institute

The mission of the Developmental Disabilities Training Institute is to foster improvements in services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities (and those with a dual diagnosis of a developmental disability and a mental health issue) through developing the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff and others involved in their lives. This includes three major areas of activity: Research within the field of developmental disabilities to identify best practices and to clarify values that enhance individual lives  Information dissemination to administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals in the field through the development of in-service training activities, collaborative work, and presentations Targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations involved in managing, coordinating, or providing services to individuals and their families.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools Transition Training

This PowerPoint explains post-secondary transition training and describes how education professionals should structure post-secondary transition planning.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Enforcement


DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative.   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid & Employment


North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC HCBS Transition Plan - 01/19/2015

The purpose of North Carolina’s preliminary transition plan, for wavier beneficiaries, is to ensure that individuals have full access to communities of their choosing. A t a minimum, this choice will include real opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively  within an integrated work force . As a result individuals will have opportunities to engage in life experiences within their own communities while improving personal outcomes. Our State’s primary goal is to ensure full compliance with HCBS Final Rule.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Supports Waiver (3.5) (0663.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, home and community supports, personal care, respite, supported employment, behavior consultation, crisis respite, crisis services, home mods, individual and caregiver training, individual goods and services (SD only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Comprehensive Waiver (3.5) (0662.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, personal care, residential supports, respite, supported employment, behavior consultant, community transition, crisis respite, crisis services, home and community supports, home mods, individual caregiver training and education, individual goods and services (self-direction only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

States - Phone

Snapshot

North Carolina was the First in Flight, and now things could soar for workers with disabilities who are taking their careers to new heights though Employment First!

State VR Rates and Services

A list of services offered by this state’s Vocational Rehabilitation agency, along with the standard rates paid for the performance of those services.

PDF icon North Carolina’s VR Rates and Services

2015 State Population.
0.98%
Change from
2014 to 2015
10,042,802
2015 Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
1.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
728,535
2015 Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64).
4.54%
Change from
2014 to 2015
234,674
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities).
2.79%
Change from
2014 to 2015
32.21%
2015 Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities).
1.08%
Change from
2014 to 2015
75.15%

State Data

General

2015
Population. 10,042,802
Number of people with disabilities (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 728,535
Number of people with disabilities who are employed (all disabilities, ages 18-64). 234,674
Number of people without disabilities who are employed (ages 18-64). 4,036,261
Percentage of working age people who are employed (all disabilities). 32.21%
Percentage of working age people who are employed (NO disabilities). 75.15%
Overall unemployment rate. 5.80%
Poverty Rate (all disabilities). 22.40%
Poverty Rate (NO disabilities). 15.50%
Number of males with disabilities (all ages). 648,264
Number of females with disabilities (all ages). 721,126
Number of Caucasians with disabilities (all ages). 964,926
Number of African Americans with disabilities (all ages). 326,487
Number of Hispanic/Latinos with disabilities (all ages). 57,974
Number of American Indians/Alaska Natives with disabilities (all ages). 21,707
Number of Asians with disabilities (all ages). 13,697
Number of Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders with disabilities (all ages). N/A
Number of with multiple races disabilities (all ages). 26,866
Number of others with disabilities (all ages). 15,203

 

SSA OUTCOMES

2015
Number of SSI recipients with disabilities who work. 7,673
Percentage of SSI recipients with disabilities who work relative to total SSI recipients with disabilities. 3.50%
Old Age Survivor and Disability Insurance (OASDI) recipients/workers with disabilities. 330,353

 

MENTAL HEALTH OUTCOMES

2015
Number of mental health services consumers who are employed. 24,655
Number of mental health services consumers who are part of the labor force (employed or actively looking for employment). 139,038
Number of adults served who have a known employment status. 165,424
Percentage of all state mental health agency consumers served in the community who are employed. 14.90%
Percentage of supported employment services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of supported housing services evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Percentage of assertive community treatment services evidence based practices (EBP). 5.50%
Percentage of medications management evidence based practices (EBP). N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported employment services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) supported housing services. N/A
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) assertive community treatment services. 6,866
Number of evidence based practices (EBP) medications management. N/A

 

WAGNER PEYSER OUTCOMES

2015
Number of registered job seekers with a disability. 15,375
Proportion of registered job seekers with a disability. 0.15

 

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT OUTCOMES (ADULTS)

2014
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work served by Job Training and Partnership Act/Workforce Investment Act programs. 1,062
Total number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment. 389
Percentage of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment relative to total the number of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work. 37.00%
Incidence rate of people with a disability that is a substantial barrier to work who entered unsubsidized employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 3.87

 

VR OUTCOMES

2016
Total Number of people served under VR.
N/A
Number of people with visual impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with communicative (hearing loss, deafness) impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with physical impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people cognitive impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people psychosocial impairments served under VR. N/A
Number of people with mental impairments served under VR. N/A
Percentage of overall closures into employment under VR. N/A
Number of employment network (EN) and vocational rehabilitation (VR) tickets assigned. 12,196
Number of eligible ticket to work beneficiaries. 475,276
Total number of ID closures using supported employment services with or without Title VI-B funds expended (VI-C prior to 2002). N/A
Total number of ID competitive labor market closures. N/A

 

IDD OUTCOMES

2014
Dollars spent on day/employment services for integrated employment funding. $18,642,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based work funding. $18,045,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for facility-based non-work funding. $89,164,000
Dollars spent on day/employment services for community based non-work funding. $16,485,000
Percentage of people served in integrated employment. 22.00%
Number of people served in community based non-work. 2,711
Number of people served in facility based work. 2,833
Number of people served in facility based non-work. 5,724
Number supported in integrated employment per 100,000 individuals in the general state population. 35.00

 

EDUCATION OUTCOMES

2014
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class 80% or more of the day (Indicator 5a). 66.45%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular class less than 40% of the day (Indicator 5b). 13.74%
Percent of children with IEPs aged 6 through 21 served in separate schools, residential facilities, or homebound/hospital placements (Indicator 5c). 1.90%
Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals (Indicator 13). 88.42%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14a). 31.88%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14b). 61.11%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school (Indicator 14c). 72.71%
Percentage of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school, and were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school (Subset of Indicator 14). 29.23%

 

ABILITYONE/JWOD PROGRAM

2014
Number of overall agency blind and SD hours. 2,972,560
Number of overall total blind and SD workers. 2,907
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (products). 1,155,874
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (services). 1,172,184
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD hours (combined). 2,328,057
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (products). 989
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (services). 1,032
Number of AbilityOne blind and SD workers (combined). 2,021
AbilityOne wages (products). $10,847,722
AbilityOne wages (services). $13,578,075

 

WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION: 14(c) CERTIFICATE-HOLDING ENTITIES OUTCOMES

2016
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding private businesses. 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Number of 14(c) certificate-holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 53
Number of 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 3
Total Number of 14(c) certificate holding entities. 56
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding private businesses. 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14 (c) certificate holding school work experience programs (SWEPs). 0
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). 3,959
Reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding patient workers. 575
Total reported number of people with disabilities working under 14(c) certificate holding entities. 4,534

 

Legislation


North Carolina HB 556 - 08/11/2015

"The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long‑established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long‑term financial planning."

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

North Carolina ABLE Legislation - 08/04/2015

 The General Assembly of North Carolina hereby finds and declares that encouraging and assisting individuals and families in saving private funds for the purpose of supporting individuals with disabilities, as authorized in the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, to maintain health, independence, and a better quality of life is fully consistent with and furthers the long established policy of the State to provide tools that strengthen opportunities for personal economic development and long term financial planning.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

NC Executive Budget Act (143-135.5) - 07/01/2007

(a)       It is the policy of this State to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in State construction projects. All State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions shall cooperate with the Department of Administration and all other State agencies, institutions and political subdivisions in efforts to encourage and promote the use of small, minority, physically handicapped and women contractors in achieving the purpose of this Article, which is the effective and economical construction of public buildings. (b)       It is the policy of this State not to accept bids or proposals from, nor to engage in business with, any business that, within the last two years, has been finally found by a court or an administrative agency of competent jurisdiction to have unlawfully discriminated on the basis of race, gender, religion, national origin, age, physical disability, or any other unlawful basis in its solicitation, selection, hiring, or treatment of another business.  
Systems
  • Other

Executive Orders


Disability Employment Awareness Month Proclamation - 10/01/2016

“WHEREAS, the State of North Carolina supports and encourages individuals with disabilities to find employment, thus fostering the key objectives of advancing individual well-being and reducing the demand on public resources, which can then be reauthorized to those with the most significant needs: and …. WHEREAS, successfully achieving this goal requires providing appropriate training, advancing best practices and engaging the business community through the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services,; the Division of Services for the Blind; the Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services; the Council on Developmental Disabilities; the Department of Public Instruction; the Community College System; the University of North Carolina System; the Department of Commerce through NCWorks; and other State of North Carolina and non-profit entities in the form of counseling, education, job training and placement, transportation assistive technology and other support services; NOW THEREFORE, I PAT McCRORY, Governor of the State of North Carolina, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2016 as “DISABILITY EMPLOYMENT AWARENESS MONTH” in North Carolina , and commend its observance to all citizens.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • Segregated Day & Employment Services

Policy


LME-MCO Communication Bulletin #J239 - 03/14/2017

~~“Effective July 22, 2016, subminimum wage employment for youth (age 14-24) cannot be considered until the following documentation is available to the subminimum wage employer:

1. The individual must receive either Pre-Employment Transition Services (PETS) from Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) while qualifying as a student with a disability or transition services under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act from a school setting.

2. The individual must apply for VR services and:a. The individual must be determined ineligible for VR services. An individual cannot be determined ineligible due to the severity of the disability without first engaging in a trial work plan. Social Security Income/Social Security Disability Income recipients must be presumed eligible if they intend to reach an employment outcome.ORb. The individual must be determined eligible and after receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) for a reasonable period of time be unsuccessful in achieving competitive integrated employment. A reasonable period of time is defined as the anticipated time frame to receive services on the IPE. For supported employment, this may be 24 months with extensions if justified.AND

3. VR must provide career counseling and information about and referral to other resources available locally that offer employment-related services and supports designed to enable the individual to explore, discover, experience and attain competitive integrated employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Disabilities Grant Program FAQ - 02/01/2017

~~“What is the Disabilities Grant Program?The Disabilities Grant Program expands school choice in North Carolina through scholarship grants for eligible children in kindergarten through 12th grade. The Disabilities Grant program provides funding of up to $8,000 per year to help parents pay qualified expenses for children with disabilities who attend school in an eligible setting.

Who applies? How does it work?Parents submit an application for the Disabilities Grant on behalf of their children. In order to receive Disabilities Grant funds, the student may attend a participating nonpublic school; the parent must arrange for application or enrollment at the school separately from the application for the Disabilities Grant. Parents, including parents who home school their children, may also seek reimbursement for qualified expenses. See the Program Overview for more information about how the Disabilities Grant works and the timeline for application and award. Also see the rest of these Frequently Asked Questions for more information about the application process and eligibility requirements.”

Systems
  • Other

“Commerce Invests More in Apprenticeships through Federal Grant” - 11/10/2016

“More North Carolina students will learn about how to train for an industry and get an education, thanks to a major new investment by the state to increase awareness of apprenticeships. Through ApprenticeshipUSA, NC Commerce will receive $1.05 million to fund the NC Apprenticeship Expansion project, which will expand apprenticeships in manufacturing, logistics/transportation, health care, and information technology. The state will increase the participation of individuals, modernize information management technologies, expand the state’s capacity to register such programs, and increase awareness through outreach efforts. The expansion effort will serve 1,500 apprentices, with a focus on youth, incumbent workers, individuals with disabilities, minorities, women, and the economically disadvantaged”

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development

Individual Supportive Employment (SE) with Long Term Vocational Supports (LTVS) YP630 - 04/18/2013

This DHHS guide on the delivery of Supported Employment services under the Developmental Disabilities and Vocational Rehabilitation systems includes Discovery, Customized Employment and Self Employment as billable services, and defines some standards for their delivery.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Self-Employment
  • Mental Health

NC AFP Position Paper (February 2012) - 02/08/2013

This position paper represents a statewide initiative sponsored by the North Carolina Alliance on Full Participation to promote the values and principles of Employment First. 

The State of North Carolina shall implement Employment First policies and practices. Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment. 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools - Policies Governing Services for Children with Disabilities (amended 7/2014) - 06/30/2010

NC 1500-2.37 Transition services  (a) Transition services means a coordinated set of activities for a child with a disability that-- (1) Is designed to be within a results-oriented process, that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with a disability to facilitate the child’s movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation; (2) Is based on the individual child’s needs, taking into account the child’s strengths, preferences and interests; and includes-- (i) Instruction; (ii) Related services; (iii) Community experiences; (iv) The development of employment and other post-school adult living objectives; and (v) If appropriate, acquisition of daily living skills and functional vocational evaluation.   (b) Transition services for children with disabilities may be special education, if provided as specially designed instruction; or a related service, if required to assist a child with a disability to benefit from special education. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1401(34); 34 CFR 300.43)  
Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Employment Services for People with Disabilities

Helping our customers find or keep a job is the main goal of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). After an evaluation of the consumer’s strengths, skills and experience, we create an employment plan. The consumer and counselor jointly develop this plan.

An employment plan may include:

Vocational evaluation Diagnostic services Physical and mental restoration Assistive technology Transportation Modifications to vehicle, home, job and worksite Personal assistance College or vocational training On-the-job training

VR staff provide information on resumé preparation, interviewing and developing job leads and assistance in locating a job. After employment, the VR counselor and consumer stay in contact to help make sure the job is a good match. A community rehabilitation program may provide services such as job coaching, supported employment and adjustment activities.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Asset Development / Financial Capability

Self-Employment Procedures

Self-employment means earning and directing one's livelihood by working for oneself rather than an employer (Webster’s Dictionary). Self-employment is a viable employment option and an achievable vocational goal in rehabilitation planning for those individuals for whom an employment outcome in self-employment is consistent with the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interest and Informed Choice (IC) of the eligible individual. (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998, issued 8/7/98 and Rehabilitation Regulations of 1998, issued 1/17/01). A self-employment business is organized as a for-profit adventure and may be in the form of a sole proprietorship, partnership, Subchapter S Corporation, C Corporation, or Limited Liability Company.

Consideration of self-employment as an employment goal will usually occur early in the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) process. It is essential the individual understands that part of being successful in business is to independently establish a business with securing funding as an essential step. The primary goal of the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor is to provide technical assistance and resource identification. The State Agency can provide guidance but shall not be considered the only resource for training, technical assistance, or financial assistance related to the business venture.

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other
Topics
  • Self-Employment

NC Employment First Website

This document outlines the services offered by the NC Department of Health and Human Services, including employment plans, employment counselors, School-to-Life services, rehabilitation engineering and benefits counseling.

NC DHHS Employment First philosophy and practice:

“Employment in the general workforce is the first and preferred outcome in the provision of publicly funded services for all citizens with disabilities regardless of level of disability, in a job of their choosing with supports and accommodations provided as necessary to achieve and maintain employment.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC DHHS Supported Employment Services

This document outlines the eligibility, the individualized plan for employment (IPE), the milestones, and post-employment steps for Supported Employment.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Other

Partnerships


NC Department of Commerce

Working across departmental lines are the N.C. Department of Commerce’s Division of Workforce Solutions (Workforce Investment Act and Wagner‐Peyser) Division  of  Employment  Security  (Unemployment  Insurance),  N.C.  Community  College  System (58 campuses), N.C. Department of Labor (apprenticeship), University of North Carolina System (16 campuses), N.C. Commission on the Status of Women, N.C. Department of Health and Human  Services’ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  and Division of  Social  Services.

Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other

NC Council on Developmental Disabilities (NCCDD) Five Year State Plan (2011-2016)

NCCDD FIVE YEAR STATE PLAN 2011 – 2016   OBJECTIVE 1.4 Council will provide funding/resources to increase access in the community for economic opportunities, inclusive of competitive employment for people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities.  ACTIVITY 1 Oct - Dec. 2011 NCCDD adopts “Employment First” Policy. (Employment First)  Oct - Dec. 2010 NC AFP delegation attends the National AFP Summit. (National AFP Summit)  ACTIVITY 2 by 9/30/13 Educate Policymakers and general public about Employment First legislation in collaboration with stakeholders.  ACTIVITY 3 10/1/2011 thru 9/30/2013 Fund State Employment Leadership Network to assist State DD Authority in Developing policies and practices that will advance integrated employment for people with I/DD. Fund State DD Authority involvement in the State Employment Leadership Network. (SELN)  ACTIVITY 4 10/01/2011thru 09/30/2016 Release funding to develop strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment. (Transition to Employment 1st)  by 10/01/2012 Select recipient(s) of funding and enter into performance agreement(s)  by 9/30/13 Develop, in partnership with stakeholders, strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  by 1/1/2014 Implement strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive  by 9/30/16 Assess effectiveness of the implementation of the strategic policy/practices and social agenda in support of full participation for people with I/DD in regular, competitive and inclusive employment.  10/1/12 thru 9/30.16 Council will provide funding/resources for public awareness of transition to work and integrated employment initiatives  
Systems
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Community of Practice for Children and Emerging Adults in Transition

Overall Goal: Share and disseminate information, romote [sic] collaboration, and advocate for improved services and improved outcomes in all areas of life for children and emerging young adults in transition.  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC State Rehabilitation Council

The purpose of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is to work with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS or VR) to expand vocational rehabilitation services. The council allows customers and stakeholders of vocational rehabilitation services to influence the policies and direction of the VR at the highest administrative level.

 

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Association of People Supporting Employment First (NC ASPE)

Members include Employment Support Professionals (job coaches, employment specialists, transition from school to work specialist, and job developers); employment services providers; community rehabilitation programs, care managers, local and state agency representatives, individuals with disabilities and their family members, advocates and guardians.

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Business Leadership Network (NCBLN)

We believe you will both enjoy and benefit from your association with our organization, as we work to expand a business-to-business network across the state that recognizes the opportunities and competitive advantages created when comprehensively engaging people with disabilities. We’re interested in talent, market share, and supplier diversity. Our job is to help you, and to hopefully engage you in helping us help others. Whether you’re a business, large or small, an agency or service provider, let us introduce you to the NCBLN and explain what we are doing, how we do it, and most importantly, where we are headed in the future.

 

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program

“…ODEP has initiated the Employment First State Leadership Mentoring Program (EFSLMP), a cross-disability, cross-systems change initiative. EFSLMP is providing a platform for multi-disciplinary state teams to focus on implementing the Employment First approach with fidelity through the alignment of policies, coordination of resources, updating of service delivery models, to facilitate increased integrated employment options for people with the most significant disabilities.”

 
Systems
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships
  • Resource Leveraging

NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

DVRS directly administers two community rehabilitation programs (CRPs). CRPs are equipped to offer a range of employment-related and support services to VR consumers with specialized needs. Services include: vocational evaluation, community-based assessment, job development, job coaching, individual or group supported employment and work adjustment activities designed to help individuals improve work skills, work behaviors and emotional/physical tolerances for a range of jobs.

 
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement

NC Employment First Steering Committee

The NC Employment First Steering Committee  “is a statewide workgroup that formed in 2011 with more than 30 members currently representing various disability groups- Mental Illness, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Substance Abuse/co-occurring, Autism, Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Traumatic Brain Injury. The goals of this group are to: Develop the future of employment services in this state Strengthen the broad-based collaborative effort between the state divisions, advocates, organizations, stakeholders, consumers and families  Be a launching point for ideas, issues, initiatives”  
Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Systems-Change Funding


NC Medicaid Infrastructure Grant - 10/12/2007

The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant Research Assistance to States (MIG-RATS) Center launched a website to provide resources and support to states implementing MIGs. The website is designed to help staff find research reports and resources, learn about MIG-RATS activities and initiatives, and connect with MIG researchers. The website includes info on topics such as Medicaid Buy-In programs, outreach and marketing, and youth in transition and also provides links to tools and a calendar of events.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program

“The Johnson & Johnson – Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program, also known as the IPS Learning Collaborative, established the family advocacy project to advance family participation in three ways. First, family advocates can educate IPS teams regarding the important roles that family can play in the employment process on an individual basis. Second, families can help educate other families and community members about the benefits of IPS supported employment and working. Third, family advocates can help promote expansion of IPS services into other communities in their state and help sustain services by advocating with the state legislature for policy and budgetary supports for IPS programs.”

“In 2013, North Carolina was invited into the larger IPS learning collaborative and is planning its family teams. Leadership of these teams have been primarily assumed through the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) state organizations. The teams are closely connected with the state IPS teams that are part of the IPS learning collaborative.”

 
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Training/Capacity Building


Supported and Customized Employment - 07/05/2011

A PowerPoint that explores both national and North-Carolina based employment outcomes and trends, and which provides an overview of Customized and Supported Employment.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other

Discovery and Customized Employment Process Training

This site was the gateway to live trainings but now contains links to presentations and handouts on Customized Employment and Discovery.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment

One-Stop Center Staff Training from the “Integrated State Workforce Plan for Title 1 of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser and Agricultural Plan as Required by the US Department of Labor ”

The Vocational Rehabilitation Representative, along with the Disability Specialist for the One‐Stop Center, coordinates yearly disability training for One‐Stop Staff. The type of disability training depends upon staff needs.  All One Stops Centers have been provided disability awareness CDs such as “The Ten Commandments of Serving Persons with Disabilities”. As new staff are hired, they meet with the Disability Specialist for orientation.   

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC APSE Presentations

NC APSE is committed to sharing information that…may be helpful to…members as well as to other stakeholders in North Carolina. NC APSE posts articles and white paper that align with their values as well as the mission and values of APSE.

Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

2016 NC APSE Conference

The ADA not only protects people with disabilities from discrimination, but also allows them to fully participate in the workforce and their communities. The theme of this conference focuses on the changes that have resulted from the passing of the ADA. We will provide an opportunity for conference attendees to learn so that they can educate and advocate for employment services throughout North Carolina.   The General Training Track will present topics relevant to North Carolina Service Providers. Break Out Sessions will cover a wide variety of topics that will meet the requirements for CESP and IPS ongoing trainings.    
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Customized Employment
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Developmental Disabilities Training Institute

The mission of the Developmental Disabilities Training Institute is to foster improvements in services and supports to persons with developmental disabilities (and those with a dual diagnosis of a developmental disability and a mental health issue) through developing the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of staff and others involved in their lives. This includes three major areas of activity: Research within the field of developmental disabilities to identify best practices and to clarify values that enhance individual lives  Information dissemination to administrators, professionals, and paraprofessionals in the field through the development of in-service training activities, collaborative work, and presentations Targeted program evaluation and technical assistance to agencies and organizations involved in managing, coordinating, or providing services to individuals and their families.  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Public Schools Transition Training

This PowerPoint explains post-secondary transition training and describes how education professionals should structure post-secondary transition planning.

 
Systems
  • Department of Education
  • Other
Topics
  • School-to-Work Transition
  • Employer Engagement
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

North Carolina Association of Rehabilitation Facilities (NCARF)

“NCARF is a professional organization dedicated to assisting its member organizations in the provision of services to individuals with disabilities. NCARF is composed of members representing North Carolina's community rehabilitation programs, Innovations Waiver providers, Supported Employment Vendors, and Residential Programs/Providers. Functioning as the unified voice of disability-related programs, NCARF is dedicated to ensuring that citizens of North Carolina are aware of the services provided by its members.”

Systems
  • Department of Rehabilitation Services
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Department of Workforce Development
Topics
  • Employer Engagement
  • Provider Transformation
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Enforcement


DOJ Settlement - Transition to Community Living Initiative “LME-MCO/ Provider Agreement” - 08/23/2012

“The State of North Carolina entered into a settlement agreement with the United States Department of Justice in 2012. The purpose of this agreement was to make sure that persons with mental illness are able to live in their communities in the least restrictive settings of their choice. The NC Department of Health and Human Services is implementing the agreement through the Transition to Community Living Initiative.   The Transition to Community Living Initiative has six primary components: In-Reach and Transition - Providing or arranging for frequent education efforts and discharge planning targeted to individuals in adult care homes and state psychiatric hospitals. Diversion – Diverting individuals from being admitted to adult care homes. Housing – Providing community-based supportive housing with tenancy supports. Supported Employment – An evidence-based service to assist individuals in preparing for, identifying, and maintaining integrated, paid, competitive employment. Assertive Community Treatment – An evidence-based treatment and support model of services offering intensive customized, community-based services for people with mental illness. Quality Management – using data to evaluate progress and outcomes.”  
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Settlement Agreement with USDOJ - 08/23/2012

The State is required to ensure that:   “Individuals have access to the array and intensity of services and supports they need to successfully transition to and live in community settings, including supported housing. Such services and supports shall: be evidence-based, recovery-focused and community-based.”      
Systems
  • Other
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

Medicaid & Employment


North Carolina Home and Community Based Services Final Rule Transition Plan - 11/01/2016

“North Carolina’s transition plan for waiver beneficiaries provides individuals with access to their communities. Among the benefits are opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively within an integrated work force, to select services and supports and who provides these, and to have the same access to community life as others. It is our intention that the unique life experiences of and personal outcomes sought by each individual will inform his or her home and community-based services and supports, and that measures of overall system performance will reflect this commitment. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS)’s plan will clearly describe the actions that will be taken to ensure, by 2018, initial and ongoing compliance with the HCBS Final Rule. The DHHS will work in partnership with and support Local Management Entities-Managed Care Organizations (LME-MCOs) and Local Lead Agencies1 in meeting the HCBS Final Rule’s intent; however, the state is ultimately responsible for the review, modification and monitoring of any laws, rules, regulations, standards, policies agreements, contracts and licensing requirements necessary to ensure that North Carolina’s HCBS settings comply with HCBS Final Rule requirements.”

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC HCBS Transition Plan - 01/19/2015

The purpose of North Carolina’s preliminary transition plan, for wavier beneficiaries, is to ensure that individuals have full access to communities of their choosing. A t a minimum, this choice will include real opportunities to seek employment and to work competitively  within an integrated work force . As a result individuals will have opportunities to engage in life experiences within their own communities while improving personal outcomes. Our State’s primary goal is to ensure full compliance with HCBS Final Rule.  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina ESEA Flexibility Request Approval - 05/29/2012

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction’s ESEA flexibility request was approved on May 29, 2012.

Systems
  • Department of Education
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

North Carolina - Piedmont Behavioral Health Care - 04/01/2005

“Under the CCNC program, North Carolina contracts with 14 community networks, which are each paid a per member per month fee to coordinate patient care. Networks are paid a higher fee to coordinate the needs of aged, blind, and disabled beneficiaries. All medical services delivered to beneficiaries are still reimbursed on a fee-for-service basis. For the 1915(b)/(b) waiver program, North Carolina contracts with three local, non-profit LMEs (Piedmont Behavioral Health, Highlands, and East Carolina Behavioral Health) to provide behavioral health services on a capitated basis.” This is a 1915(b)(c) concurrent waiver. The (b) portion allows selective contracting to provide mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse services to all age groups in Cabarrus, Davidson, Rowan, Stanley & Union counties.

 
Systems
  • Department of Mental Health
  • Department of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Mental Health
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)
  • Cross-Agency Collaboration / Partnerships

NC Medicaid State Plan

Title XIX of the Social Security Act requires that North Carolina provide a plan to administer and manage the North Carolina Medicaid Program. The North Carolina Medicaid State Plan outlines the organization and function of the Division of Medical Assistance. It provides amount, scope and duration of services, as well as eligibility requirements.

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Money Follows the Person

Money Follows the Person (MFP) is a state project that assists Medicaid-eligible North Carolinians who live in inpatient facilities to move into their own homes and communities with supports.   DMA was awarded its MFP grant from CMS in May 2007 and began supporting individuals to transition in 2009. Under the Affordable Care Act, MFP was extended through 2020  
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
  • Other

NC Supports Waiver (3.5) (0663.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, home and community supports, personal care, respite, supported employment, behavior consultation, crisis respite, crisis services, home mods, individual and caregiver training, individual goods and services (SD only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptation for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 
Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)

NC Comprehensive Waiver (3.5) (0662.R01.00)

“Provides adult day health, day supports, personal care, residential supports, respite, supported employment, behavior consultant, community transition, crisis respite, crisis services, home and community supports, home mods, individual caregiver training and education, individual goods and services (self-direction only), long term vocational supports, PERS, specialized consultative services, specialized equipment and supplies, transportation, vehicle adaptations for individuals w/autism, DD, IID ages 0 - no max age.”

 

 

Systems
  • Medicaid Agencies
Topics
  • Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)